CHALLENGE + APPROACH

Purchasing a bike online can be overwhelming, especially for first time buyers. Rather, a traditional brick and mortar experience offers the guidance customers prefer.  

How might we merge the convenience of shopping online with the comfort of shopping in store?

My role was to facilitate research and conceptualize the brand identity and overall user experience. I managed a copywriter, motion designer and engineer to help execute the designs.

 

TEAM

  • Michael Bartolomei Copywriter

  • Sonny Geha Software Engineer

  • Patima Pataramekin Project Lead / Designer / Researcher

  • Tyson Stryg Motion Graphic Designer


RESEARCH snapshot

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GOALS

1. To leverage existing research to inform study

2. To uncover key bike buying moments or purchasing expectations

3. To observe sales associate interactions and identify customer goals, needs, and expectations

METHODOLOGY

  • Data Mining

  • Contextual Observations (77)

  • Intercepts (8)

  • At-Home Visits (8)

  • Day-in-the-Life Shadows (2)

  • A/B Testing (16)

  • Journey Mapping (1)


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Timeline

 
 

Participant Sample


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DIsCOVERy

understanding NEEDS

By observing female bicyclists, the design team gained an understanding for how women use their bikes. The team uncovered trends in accessories and discovered use cases that informed the structure of our site navigation, customization and buy flow.

Shadowing employees at bike shops illuminated techniques used to put customers at ease and simplify the decision making process. 

 

IDENTIFYING PAIN POINTS

Interviews provided us with insights that guided our designs. The client's assumption of comfort and proper fit as the leading pain points were found to be incorrect. Rather, the team's research demonstrated that customers primarily felt overwhelmed by too many choices.

I created customer journey maps to identify the pain points and design opportunities.

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ITERATion

TESTING my DESIGNS

One insight gained from A/B testing my designs is that customers want to know the details in the fine print, and yet felt overwhelmed by them.

After A/B testing the customization flow, I learned that 83% of our participants preferred choosing between two features rather than three. In hopes to prevent cart abandonment, testing this flow helped identify moments of buyer exhaustion.

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Developing the EXPERIENCE

PRODUCT RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Show don't tell. Use visuals instead of descriptions to reduce cognitive overload.

  • Simplify the buy flow. Eliminate unnecessary steps to reduce redundancy.

  • Create a quiz. Use results to provide recommendations and expedite the flow.

Visual treatment

The team's research informed the visual language I used to design the brand identity.

I created a style guide to define our brand, messaging and visual language.

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IMPLEMENTation

ESTABLISHING DESIGN PRINCIPLES

The team's research informed my product strategy, design and overall user experience. I developed a site that provided our customer’s clients the comfort of shopping in a store but with the convenience of shopping online.

Some examples of our guiding design principles: Our brand feels personal, like chatting with a old friend or Our website feels effortless, like flipping through a magazine. 

 

REDUCING THE CLUTTER

Progressive disclosure made it easy for customers to discover information when needed, but hide it otherwise. I created a prototype to test amongst users in order to refine the placement placement and discoverability of the buttons used.

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FINAL DESIGN

FROM CREATION TO HAND-OFF

I created the final design using Sketch. Prior to handing off the files to the engineer, I created a spreadsheet outlining each page— detailing the copy, asset links, heuristic values, and a prioritized checklist for completion.

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© 2019 Patima P. Pataramekin